Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Ins and Outs

. . . of financing your bike and bike-related purchases within the confines of your marital pact:

1. Establish a 'bike account' (real or imaginary) that is purportedly funded by work bonuses that may or may not actually exist and the sale of shit-can bikes and components on craigslist that go for "amazing sums".  It's important to talk about the bike account at every opportunity, ad nauseam, until it is a household term. Since its purpose is to explain everything.

2. When the bike account runs dry, as it surely will, dip into "supplement" with the joint checking account as required, but with great discretion. And hope to hell you don't get audited by the CFO.

And that's pretty much all there is to it.

Not that I have my eye on a new bike or anything.  Just presenting this in the interest of public bike service.

8 comments:

Hank Greer said...

Today I told my wife I had deposited a check in our account. She responded that she didn't even know I had received that check. It would have made a great start for a bike account.

Pat S said...

Indeed. Nice to see that the wheels are turning.

Scott said...

Thanks for the public service. My last bike I got, I think my wife just got tired of me talking about it all the time. So now I'm in a particularly tricky situation that needs careful finessing. The new one is barely a month old, and the fatbike is still calling. But they're harder to hide than a new mandolin or concertina or pass off as something I've had for a long time. Luckily I have a very understanding wife, but I probably shouldn't push too hard. Time to start selling, wheeling and dealing.

Scott said...

p.s. that's a nice pic of the 9 Zero 7

Dan said...

Not me. In my Household, after years of shrewd politicking, I have achieved the position of Chairman of not only the Recreational Committee, but also the Equipment Purchase Committee. Lofty and impressive positions.

Unfortunately, still, Liz is Chairperson of the Budget Committee . . .

Andy D. said...

It's good to see that you've developed strategies similar to some I've put into practice. Your corroborating evidence increases my confidence in continued positive outcomes.

In the past, you have alluded to a successful career in manufacturing, but your public service as bike financial advisor may be an underutilized talent.

Matt Campbell said...

I've been following your blog for a few weeks now and I have to say, this missive of yours has me thinking. Perhaps I could implement some of my own financial skullduggery in order to achieve my bike purchase related ends.

bikewrider said...

There's a reason I build bikes one part at a time. Easier to fly under the radar of the auditor, then when the time is just right I casually mention a great deal I saw on a frame that I just happen to have all the other necessary parts around for.